Professor of History Matthew G. Stanard

Dr. Matthew G. Stanard was interviewed by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s “Nightlife” program on the declaration of Leopold II’s Congo Free State in 1885. Listen here, http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/this-week-in-history-the-congo-free-state/10076286.

Dr.. Stanard also recently published two essays, both of which resulted from international collaborations with scholars in Europe. His essay “Post-1945 Colonial Historiography and the New Imperial History” appeared in The Colonial Past in History Textbooks: Historical and Social Psychological Perspectives. Also appearing was his essay “‘Il passato (coloniale) non è affatto morto, anzi non è nemmeno passato’: la storia dell’imperialismo, la decolonizzazione e le culture europee dopo il 1945,” an Italian translation of one of Dr. Stanard’s recent research articles, translated by Guido Mattia Gallerani. It appeared in Scritture Migranti: Rivista di Scambi Interculturali.

Associate Professor of History Matthew G. Stanard

Dr. Matthew G. Stanard’s latest book, “European Overseas Empire, 1879-1999: A Short History,” is being published by Wiley, a well-known and global publisher of academic books and journals. (www.wiley.com/buy/9781119130109) Stanard’s book examines our collective past, providing new insight and fresh perspectives as it traces current events to their roots in the European overseas imperialism of the 19th and 20th centuries. The book also challenges the notion of political, cultural, social, and economic exchanges of the era as being primarily “Europe-outward,” while it also examines the complexity and contingency of colonial rule, and the range of outcomes for the various territories involved. In short, the book explores the power dynamics of overseas empires, and their legacies that continue to shape the world today.

Dr. Stanard is a historian of modern European history who specializes in European imperialism and decolonization from the 1800s to the second half of the twentieth century. At Berry College, Dr. Stanard offers courses on modern Europe, the history of Africa since 1800, world history, as well as a course on imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism. He has lived or traveled in Europe regularly since the early 1980s. In addition to this latest book, Dr. Stanard has published numerous essays on European overseas imperialism, comparative empires, Belgian colonialism in the Congo, and colonial culture in Europe, as well as the book Selling the Congo (Nebraska, 2011). He has been a Wolfsonian Fellow at the Wolfsonian-Florida International University in Miami Beach, Florida, a Belgian American Educational Foundation Fellow in Brussels, a Chancellor’s Fellow at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and a participant in the National History Center’s Decolonization Seminar in Washington, D.C. In January 2017, he co-organized a major international conference in Birmingham, England, on “The End of Empire: European Popular Responses.”

Professor of History Larry Marvin

Professor of History Larry Marvin has had his book “The Occitan War: A Military and Political History of the Albigensian Crusade, 1209-1218” (Cambridge University Press, 2008) appear in a Polish translation as “Krucjata Przeciw Albigensom: Militarna i polityczna historia wojny oksytańskiej, 1209-1218” (publisher Napoleon V).

Associate Professor and Department Chair of History Matthew Stanard

Associate Professor and Department Chair of History Matthew G. Stanard recently published several research articles and a book review:

— “Revisiting Bula Matari and the Congo Crisis: Successes and Anxieties in Belgium’s Late Colonial State,” in the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History;

— “Après nous, le déluge: Belgium, Decolonization, and the Congo,” in The Oxford Handbook of the Ends of Empire, edited by Martin Thomas & Andrew Thompson of the University of Exeter (U.K.);

— a revised edition of “Belgian Colonial Rule,” in the African Studies series of Oxford Bibliographies (Oxford University Press);

— “‘Boom! Goes the Congo’: The Rhetoric of Control and Belgium’s Late Colonial State,” in Rhetorics of Empire: Languages of colonial conflict after 1900 (Manchester University Press);

— and a review of Dina Gusejnova’s European Elites and Ideas of Empire, 1917-1957, on H-Empire.

Assistant Professor of History Jennifer Hoyt

Dr. Jennifer T. Hoyt has reshaped what the Department of History offers its majors and the campus at large by teaching a range of new courses on Colonial Latin America, Modern Latin America, Modern Mexico, and Environmental History. This spring semester (2017) she taught a new course on film and the Cold War, a class that marries her knowledge and love for both the study of the past and motion pictures.

This year she also traveled to Stockholm, Sweden, for a workshop on the impact and legacies of the 1972 UN Conference on the Human Environment. In Stockholm she presented a paper based on research completed at the United Nations Archives in New York City during the summer of 2016.

Associate Professor of History Matthew G. Stanard

Dr. Stanard co-organized “The End of Empire: European Popular Responses,” conference which took place in Birmingham, England, Jan. 11-13. The Evans School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences was a major sponsor of this international conference, which involved numerous scholars from some 10 countries, including the U.S., Denmark, Australia, the U.K., France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Dr. Stanard presented at the conference his own research titled, “Some ABCs of Post-Colony Belgium: Africana, Belgian Collections, and the Decolonization Experience.”

He also recently published “The colonial past is never dead. It’s not even past: Histories of Empire, Decolonization, and European Cultures after 1945” as the invited Forum essay for the 2016 Jahrbuch für Europäische Geschichte/European History Yearbook. Dr. Stanard’s chapter “Interwar Crises and Europe’s Unfinished Empires” also has appeared in print in the volume “The Oxford Handbook of Europe 1914-1945”, published by Oxford University Press. He published reviews of Anthony Pagden’s “The Burdens of Empire”(on H-Empire), Dean Pavlakis’s “British Humanitarianism and the Congo Reform Movement, 1896-1913” and Nancy Rose Hunt’s “A Nervous State” in the Journal of The History of Medicine and Allied Sciences.

In April, Dr. Stanard traveled to Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain, to serve on an international Ph.D. defense committee at the Universidad del País Vasco. The dissertation being examined, “La Guerra civil en el País Vasco en la prensa local norteamericana (1936-1939),” was an in-depth analysis of local U.S. press coverage of the Spanish Civil War as it affected Spain’s Basque Country. While in Spain, he gave a lecture at the the Universidad del País Vasco’s Leioa Campus, outside Bilbao, on “The Congo and Decolonization: From Belgian Empire to Cold War Crisis.”