Speaking Your Mind and Finding Your Future at Berry

Avery James is building a remarkable record at Berry: the junior is a talented poet and a top psychology student who is a two-time state forensics champion competing at a national level. She volunteers with developmentally challenged children and is working on securing an internship at a nonprofit serving homeless women and children. When she graduates from Berry, she plans on earning two graduate degrees: a Master of Fine Arts in poetry first and then an advanced degree to work as a clinical psychologist. And talking to Avery, one has no doubt that she will reach all her goals.

What’s surprising to hear Avery admit is that when she first came to Berry from Conyers, Georgia, she was “a bit shy.” Then she saw a sign for a Forensics Union meeting, which she mistook for a forensic psychology meeting. “It didn’t take me long to realize I was at a club meeting, not a psychology class,” she laughed. “It was the happiest accident I ever made.” Being a member of Berry’s very successful Forensics Union has given her the “confidence to become an advocate for social change.”

Avery has ready advice for students considering Berry: always talk to your professors. “They love it when you come into their offices – in fact, they expect it.” Also, learn to balance your personal needs with those of others. “Even though college is very hectic and you’ll be pulled in a million directions, put yourself first.” And finally, “Don’t pet the deer. I learned that the hard way,” she laughs.

Talented Actor Finds his Perfect Role: Medicine

Tyler Vaughan loves to solve puzzles and one of the puzzles he’s most enjoyed solving at Berry is that of his future profession.

Tyler came to Berry from Ringgold, Georgia, thinking he wanted to pursue a career as an actor. And indeed, he did land a plum role as the lead in a Berry production of “Peter and the Starcatcher.” Then he started to take classes in anatomy and physiology and thought about how interesting and complex the human body is. “I realized medicine has been an integral part of our success as a species. It contributes so much to our quality of life,” he reflected. As a Gate of Opportunity Scholar, Tyler had a job as a student trainer in sports medicine where he worked with several Berry athletic teams. With all the patient contact, he started to think about becoming a physical therapist working with performers. After conversations with friends and professors, however, Tyler realized he wanted to leap into the field of medicine with both feet and become an M.D. “From the minute I made the decision to become a doctor, everything just felt right,” he said. Tyler has shadowed an internist and a neurologist and made two medical mission trips to Nicaragua. He also volunteers at a nearby free clinic.

As a psychology major with a chemistry minor, Tyler has thought a lot about what motivates people. In his social psychology class, he learned that “as humans, we have two basic needs:  to belong and to be correct.” He said that a choice for Berry allows students to both belong – and be right.  “Berry’s community is so accepting. There’s some place for everyone to belong here,” he said.

Professor of Teacher Education Mary C. Clement

Dr. Clement presented “Helping Teachers with Assessment: 6 Important Keys” March 6 at the Critical Questions in Education Conference in Portland, Ore. Additionally, Dr. Clement presented “Getting a Teaching Job Now” for University of Portland and Concordia College of Oregon education majors.

Assistant Professor of Nursing Rebecca Logan

Dr. Logan was selected for an educational grant from Mead Johnson Nutrition to cover all related expenses for the National Association of Neonatal Nurses Annual Conference in October 2017. Selected individuals attended the fully-compensated annual conference to provide encore presentations from the Research Summit in a special session devoted to nursing research. Out of the twelve 2017 Research Summit participants, three were chosen for this honor. Dr. Logan presented “The Journey of a Hero: The Lived Experience of Fathering a Premature Infant in a NICU” and “Holding: The Defining Moment for Fathers in the NICU” at the poster session.

Jennifer Wayman takes hard work to the next level

In her four years at Berry, senior Jennifer Wayman has worked as a veterinary assistant and research assistant as well as held positions at the horse barn, beef cattle unit, and the Berry student enterprises. “I have been able to invest myself in my on-campus jobs and develop quality relationships,” says Jennifer, an Animal Science/ Pre-Vet major. “Berry has prepared me with a pretty impressive resume. I feel like the experiences and opportunities I have gotten at Berry would not have been offered to me at other schools.” Berry’s firsthand experience also benefited Jennifer when she interned with the Georgia Department of Agriculture last summer. “I was able to experience veterinary medicine on a much larger scale,” she says. After graduating this spring, Jennifer plans on applying to veterinary school.

Story by student social media assistant Shannon Rainey

Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Brian Campbell

On February 10, 2018, Dr. Brian Campbell spoke at the Floyd County Seed Swap at the Chieftains Museum and Major Ridge Home in Rome, Ga. An annual event now in its fifth year, the Floyd County Seed Swap was sponsored by the Berry College Environmental Studies Program along with several local organizations. Dr. Campbell spoke about several issues related to his research and teaching, including agricultural biodiversity conservation, the preservation of heirloom seeds, Cherokee agriculture, and how to cultivate different plant varieties to further local biodiversity.

It is through events such as the Floyd County Seed Swap that Dr. Campbell, who joined the Berry faculty in 2013, has established himself as a campus leader of community engagement. He is also a major agent of community-based teaching at Berry, including through his work as a leader of the college’s Environmental Studies Program, including its ABC Project (https://sites.berry.edu/abc/). His course offerings at Berry include the anthropology of food, environmental anthropology, and a class on environment, society, and culture, among others.

Dr. Campbell is also a documentary film director and producer and author of numerous publications, among them (with James R. Veteto), “Free seeds and food sovereignty: anthropology and grassroots agrobiodiversity conservation strategies in the US South,” which appeared in a 2015 issue of Journal of Political Ecology.

Associate Professor Brian Campbell 

Associate Professor of History Matthew G. Stanard

Dr. Matthew G. Stanard’s latest book, “European Overseas Empire, 1879-1999: A Short History,” is being published by Wiley, a well-known and global publisher of academic books and journals. (www.wiley.com/buy/9781119130109) Stanard’s book examines our collective past, providing new insight and fresh perspectives as it traces current events to their roots in the European overseas imperialism of the 19th and 20th centuries. The book also challenges the notion of political, cultural, social, and economic exchanges of the era as being primarily “Europe-outward,” while it also examines the complexity and contingency of colonial rule, and the range of outcomes for the various territories involved. In short, the book explores the power dynamics of overseas empires, and their legacies that continue to shape the world today.

Dr. Stanard is a historian of modern European history who specializes in European imperialism and decolonization from the 1800s to the second half of the twentieth century. At Berry College, Dr. Stanard offers courses on modern Europe, the history of Africa since 1800, world history, as well as a course on imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism. He has lived or traveled in Europe regularly since the early 1980s. In addition to this latest book, Dr. Stanard has published numerous essays on European overseas imperialism, comparative empires, Belgian colonialism in the Congo, and colonial culture in Europe, as well as the book Selling the Congo (Nebraska, 2011). He has been a Wolfsonian Fellow at the Wolfsonian-Florida International University in Miami Beach, Florida, a Belgian American Educational Foundation Fellow in Brussels, a Chancellor’s Fellow at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and a participant in the National History Center’s Decolonization Seminar in Washington, D.C. In January 2017, he co-organized a major international conference in Birmingham, England, on “The End of Empire: European Popular Responses.”

Associate Professor of Music Kris Carlisle

Dr. Kris Carlisle has been accepted to a residency at The Hambidge Center for the 2018 summer session. He was chosen from 285 applications from around the world competing for 50 spots.

Hambidge provides a residency program that empowers talented individuals to explore, develop, and express their creative voices. Situated on 600 acres in the mountains of north Georgia, Hambidge is a sanctuary of time and space that inspires individuals working in a broad range of disciplines to create works of the highest caliber.

 

Professor of History Larry Marvin

Professor of History Larry Marvin has had his book “The Occitan War: A Military and Political History of the Albigensian Crusade, 1209-1218” (Cambridge University Press, 2008) appear in a Polish translation as “Krucjata Przeciw Albigensom: Militarna i polityczna historia wojny oksytańskiej, 1209-1218” (publisher Napoleon V).

Associate Professor and Department Chair of History Matthew Stanard

Associate Professor and Department Chair of History Matthew G. Stanard recently published several research articles and a book review:

— “Revisiting Bula Matari and the Congo Crisis: Successes and Anxieties in Belgium’s Late Colonial State,” in the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History;

— “Après nous, le déluge: Belgium, Decolonization, and the Congo,” in The Oxford Handbook of the Ends of Empire, edited by Martin Thomas & Andrew Thompson of the University of Exeter (U.K.);

— a revised edition of “Belgian Colonial Rule,” in the African Studies series of Oxford Bibliographies (Oxford University Press);

— “‘Boom! Goes the Congo’: The Rhetoric of Control and Belgium’s Late Colonial State,” in Rhetorics of Empire: Languages of colonial conflict after 1900 (Manchester University Press);

— and a review of Dina Gusejnova’s European Elites and Ideas of Empire, 1917-1957, on H-Empire.

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